1990

During the Taliban regime

V

In the 90s, AMI stays in Afghanistan despite the historical record of violence registered in the country. Humanitarian NGOs are determined to continue their work in the field, despite the elevated number of attacks on aid workers, and despite the uncertainty over the funding of their actions. Out of 164 attacks recorded against NGOs worldwide (by the Aid Workers Security site), 79 took place in Afghanistan.

1994 : AMI creates a thematic newspaper, “Salamati”, distributed in healthcare centers to medical workers (doctors, nurses and pharmacists). Objective: To strengthen medical knowledge and skills of health workers.

July 1998 : The Taliban chase INGOs out of Kabul.

11 September 2001 : Terrorist attacks target the USA.

The “AMI car” is pushed by its teams of doctors and logisticians to cross a fragile suspension bridge.

Credit: Yves Bourny / Archives Aide Médicale Internationale

In the back of an AMI vehicle, Adela, an Afghan interpreter, must wear a full face veil. The Taliban have taken control of the country, the rules are strict: drivers of all types of vehicles are prohibited from transporting women not covered by tchadri. Penalty: imprisonment of the driver.

Credit: Yves Bourny / Archives Aide Médicale Internationale

Another AMI vehicle, this time a bus, crosses the Sarobi Gorge, east of the Kabul region.

Credit: Yves Bourny / Archives Aide Médicale Internationale

The head of mission Yves Bourny, surrounded by his Logar team. Doctors, logisticians, administrators: all work for the smooth running of progams.

Credit: Yves Bourny / Archives Aide Médicale Internationale

Yves Bourny poses alongside Mollah Karim Shah, a religious authority in charge of overseeing health activities in one of the eastern provinces. Under Taliban rule, humanitarian teams had to deal with these interlocutors to set up health activities.

Credit: Yves Bourny / Archives Aide Médicale Internationale

Winter 98, province of Logar. The head of mission, Yves Bourny, repairs one of the wheels of the AMI car to continue moving forward in the harsh Afghan winter.

Credit: Yves Bourny / Archives Aide Médicale Internationale

Health facilities are still dilapidated and makeshift, located in remote and difficult to access places.

Credit: Archives Aide Médicale Internationale

AMI opens the first pharmacies which act as pharmacies. The majority of women come to collect medicines for their families.

Credit: Archives Aide Médicale Internationale

AMI began production of the magazine "Salamati" in the 1990s. This periodical, published in 5,000 copies every three months, relays health education messages (prevention and promotion of vaccination campaigns). It is one of the last magazines published in Persian and uncensored by the Taliban.

Credit: Archives Aide Médicale Internationale

Doctors use the MUAC to check if an Afghan child is malnourished. Even today and 8.2 million people face food insecurity in Afghanistan.

Credit: Archives Aide Médicale Internationale

One of the health structures opened by AMI in the 90s and its staff. Health facilities are still dilapidated and makeshift, located in remote and difficult to access places.

Credit: Archives Aide Médicale Internationale

AMI teams form community relays to educate families, especially mothers, about medicine, nutrition, and primary care.

Credit: Archives Aide Médicale Internationale

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